Report Child Care Fraud

If you suspect Child Care Fraud, be a part of the solution. You may remain anonymous. Please fill out the Child Care Fraud Form, or email dcfmbchildcarefraud @wisconsin.gov.

Report a Child Care Concern or Complaint

If you have a concern about something going on in a child care facility or you suspect child abuse, neglect or exploitation at a child care facility, please use the drop-down menu on the Tell Us How We Are Doing page to fill out the appropriate complaint form.

Mother holding little girl in her lap

Finding Resources

Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) and
Individualized Education Program (IEP) Connections

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA 2004) assures supports and services to eligible children with disabilities and delays.

If you have concerns or questions about a child's development (physical, social-emotional, or cognitive), contact: Wisconsin First Step Information and Referral Hotline at 1-800-642-STEP (7837).

 

For children from birth to age 3

Each county in Wisconsin has a Birth to 3 Program that provides early intervention services to infants and toddlers with developmental delays or disabilities. For each child referred for an initial evaluation, an Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) is developed by the IFSP Team as a blueprint for services. The IFSP Team includes a service coordinator, the family, and the child care provider. The IFSP includes goals that reflect family and team priorities and outlines the services, resources, and supports available. The IFSP also identifies what services will be provided, where and by whom. For example, some services are provided in the child's home while others may occur in child care centers. Parents may find out more about services in their area for children from birth to age three by contacting Wisconsin First Step at 1-800-642-7837.

 

For children ages 3 through 21

Each public school district is required under federal law (IDEA 2004) to provide special education and related services to children with disabilities ages three through 21. Parents and school specialists work together to determine eligibility and develop a plan, called an Individualized Education Program (IEP), for the child with disabilities. An IEP contains important information about the child's strengths and specific disability, along with parent-identified needs, optimal methods for teaching, and ways in which staff can collaborate to support the child. The IEP also includes goals for the child and expectations of parents school staff members. The IEP defines services in the least restrictive environment. The least restrictive environment could be found within child care settings, because services from the school does not have to mean "services in the school."

Child care providers are not required to attend IEP meetings nor follow IEP goals. When parents and providers collaborate with others to support the child, however, everyone benefits - especially the child. Parents may, for example, invite their child care provider to review the IEP, attend IEP meetings, and make suggestions for integrating goals and activities.

Parents may find out more about services available in their area for children ages 3 to 21 by contacting their local school district or Wisconsin First Step at 1-800-642-7837. Parents have rights and procedural safeguards within each system mentioned above. Technical assistance resources are available to help parents secure the most appropriate services for their child.

Parents have rights and procedural safeguards within each of the two systems mentioned above (the IFSP system and the IEP system). Technical assistance resources are available to help parents secure the most appropriate services for their children.